Welcome to the MacNN Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

You are here: MacNN Forums > Community > MacNN Lounge > just got a motorcycle! (pic inside™)

just got a motorcycle! (pic inside™)
Thread Tools
phantomdragonz
Mac Elite
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Near Boulder, CO
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 1, 2005, 05:03 PM
 
So I have been wanting a motorcycle for YEARS, and two days ago I finally got one....

it's a 1988 Honda VTR250, it's a small old funny street bike, and let me tell you it's a BLAST, I have never ridden a motorcycle before yesterday and let me tell you, it's EASY!

I should note that I have only beed riding it around my block, have not been over 25mph yet...

I can't wait to take my MSF class (class is last week in july) I want my license so I can go cruise around in the mountains (I live in colorado)

Today I am going to buy a nice jacket and pants, and probably gloves too...



The previous owner destroyed the upper fairing, and since these bikes were only made for three years the plastic is hard to come by...

it gets 55-65 Miles Per Gallon!!!!!


anybody else have a motorcycle?

Zach
( Last edited by phantomdragonz; Jul 1, 2005 at 05:05 PM. Reason: mpg)
     
ghporter
Administrator
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: San Antonio TX USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 1, 2005, 05:15 PM
 
Make sure you don't do much more than get used to really, REALLY local riding in perfect conditions before you get to your MSF course. You will be amazed by what you learn in that course! I had quite a bit of experience before I took it and it made me an enormously safer and more confident rider.

I haven't ridden in a long time-too busy and too broke to buy a new bike-but when I finally give in to the urge to get one, I'll take the course again. One stat that they'll teach you is that a rider is least safe in the first six months of riding, and that means the first six months of riding ANYTHING new, too. Learning the bike is a lot different from learning the details of a different car...

Take the course, then enjoy!

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
MallyMal
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Aug 2002
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 1, 2005, 05:33 PM
 
Originally Posted by phantomdragonz
I have never ridden a motorcycle before yesterday and let me tell you, it's EASY!
That's cool, but you shouldn't be overestimating your skills. Your bike is only a 250(I learned on a 500) once you get on something like a 600-750 you will be reconsidering your skills. I'm not trying to be mean, I'm just saying don't get cocky.

Yes, get those gloves and jacket too. I assume you already have a good helmet. Gear is very important.
     
viperstrike
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Aug 2002
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 1, 2005, 06:14 PM
 
Congrats on you new bike! I've been riding for 9+ years and let me tell you, the MSF class will SAVE YOUR LIFE! I started riding on an EX500 and 4 months later i took the class. What a difference. The things you learn are not intuitive (well, at least not to me), but after the class, it's almost second nature. Here are some examples of things that you learn that i never knew:

- NEVER break while turning (high-siding...not fun)
- push right, go right...HUH?!? (Once you master this, turning is so FUN!)
- look ahead of the turn. Where you look is where you go. If you look down, guess where you're going.

Ride safe and have fun!

And a piece of advise on gear: Don't go cheap on the helmet. $10.00 helmet, $10.00 head.

By the way, this is what i ride now:
( Last edited by viperstrike; Jul 1, 2005 at 07:05 PM. )
     
bradoesch
Professional Poster
Join Date: Jun 2000
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 1, 2005, 07:38 PM
 
Mint. I learned on a Ninja 500 too. I had rode dirtbikes since my early days so I didn't have that much to learn for the motorcycle.
     
Freeflyer
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: London, UK
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 1, 2005, 08:31 PM
 
Good bike to learn on. But EASY, man do you have a lot to learn. I'm an ex instructor and have been riding for over 20 years and I'm still learning. It may be easy to potter around the neighbourhood now, but when you go faster and further, you'll understand that you so far know about 1% of what it takes to ride safely and well.

Try to temper your enthusiasm a little, recognise that you're a rank beginner and then go take some training courses. Seriously, what you learn will save your life one day. Motorcycles are one of the most fun things you can drive, but they're very, very vulnerable to every other idiot on the road.

Oh, and buy some gloves. More important than fancy leather jeans are good gloves and good boots. If you come off, your hands are likely to be the first thing to hit, and it's not easy to regrow fingers. If a car hits you, you're feet are where they first make contact. Motorcross boots have served me well and I recommend them, they're the reason I still have a right foot, after being hit 20 years ago.

Don't mean to be down on you, but I'd like to see you stay alive long enough to enjoy your new hobby. Welcome to the family.

J.
By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out - Richard Dawkins
     
Rev-O
Mac Elite
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Parker, Colorado
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 1, 2005, 08:55 PM
 
Originally Posted by phantomdragonz
So I have been wanting a motorcycle for YEARS, and two days ago I finally got one....
The previous owner destroyed the upper fairing, and since these bikes were only made for three years the plastic is hard to come by...
Zach
Congrats! Colorado has some nice momo weather, I've ridden in December more than once... you just hafta dress warm and watch out for sand!

Learned to ride on a VFR 700 F2 (1988 variety, IIRC)

MSF classes are good, went through one with my wife and both thought it was very good. Buy good gear. Quality jacket, gloves and helmet are a must must, followed closely by boots and pants. Remember, the good stuff isn't cheap. Performance Cycle on Broadway and Evans in Denver is one good place for gear, I've bought my helmet, gloves and boots there.

Also, I think the DUMP (Denver Used Motorcyle Parts) is still kicking around... check 'em out for the fairing upper, but it may be tough.


CBR 929RR, what I'm riding now!
Curse your sudden but inevitable betrayal!
     
KeriVit
Professional Poster
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: In the South
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 1, 2005, 09:22 PM
 
EXCELLENT


just don't become an organ donor- be safe- have fun- good luck!
     
broxy5
Dedicated MacNNer
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: no fixed address
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 1, 2005, 09:29 PM
 
Mine

     
ghporter
Administrator
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: San Antonio TX USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 1, 2005, 09:39 PM
 
Originally Posted by Freeflyer
Good bike to learn on. But EASY, man do you have a lot to learn. I'm an ex instructor and have been riding for over 20 years and I'm still learning. It may be easy to potter around the neighbourhood now, but when you go faster and further, you'll understand that you so far know about 1% of what it takes to ride safely and well.

Try to temper your enthusiasm a little, recognise that you're a rank beginner and then go take some training courses. Seriously, what you learn will save your life one day. Motorcycles are one of the most fun things you can drive, but they're very, very vulnerable to every other idiot on the road.

Oh, and buy some gloves. More important than fancy leather jeans are good gloves and good boots. If you come off, your hands are likely to be the first thing to hit, and it's not easy to regrow fingers. If a car hits you, you're feet are where they first make contact. Motorcross boots have served me well and I recommend them, they're the reason I still have a right foot, after being hit 20 years ago.

Don't mean to be down on you, but I'd like to see you stay alive long enough to enjoy your new hobby. Welcome to the family.

J.
I concurr with EVERYTHING he says, plus a little. Not just "a" helmet. While you're learning at least get a full face helmet. I wouldn't ride without a full face helmet because it does so many things for you besides keep your jaw protected. It blocks exhaust fumes (at least to an extent), it keeps your mouth from freezing in the winter (I have indeed been to Colorado in the winter, so yes, this is IMPORTANT), the bugs won't get in under your visor in one of these, and of course there's the issue of protection.

Many younger riders figure that they are so fast and so skilled that they'll never have an accident. What they reall think is that they'll never cause their own accident. They may be right. But what about Jerkface the Terrible in his Belchfire 88? Not only can he not see you, he's out to get you. (Sorry for more rain on your parade, but riding a bit paranoid is kind of necessary in U.S. traffic.) So you have to plan for what happens when somebody cuts you off, bumps your rear tire, or otherwise messes with you. Protect yourself and live to ride another day.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
Rev-O
Mac Elite
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Parker, Colorado
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 1, 2005, 09:51 PM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter
I concurr with EVERYTHING he says, plus a little. Not just "a" helmet. While you're learning at least get a full face helmet. I wouldn't ride without a full face helmet because it does so many things for you besides keep your jaw protected. It blocks exhaust fumes (at least to an extent), it keeps your mouth from freezing in the winter (I have indeed been to Colorado in the winter, so yes, this is IMPORTANT), the bugs won't get in under your visor in one of these, and of course there's the issue of protection.

Many younger riders figure that they are so fast and so skilled that they'll never have an accident. What they reall think is that they'll never cause their own accident. They may be right. But what about Jerkface the Terrible in his Belchfire 88? Not only can he not see you, he's out to get you. (Sorry for more rain on your parade, but riding a bit paranoid is kind of necessary in U.S. traffic.) So you have to plan for what happens when somebody cuts you off, bumps your rear tire, or otherwise messes with you. Protect yourself and live to ride another day.
True speak this.
Ride like every land squid is out to kill you. Always have a way out. Be aware. Be visible.
Ride with your brights on during the day. Flash your brake lights when preparing to stop. Lane splitting in Colorado is a big no no.
And always wear gear. Arriving alive is more important than looking cool getting there!
Sheesh, all you wet blankets are doing a nice PSA for us momo riders out here. All the stuff I do instictively... we all need to pay attention to this.
Curse your sudden but inevitable betrayal!
     
glyph
Junior Member
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Alaska
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 03:04 AM
 
82 Kawasaki GPZ 1100


Watch out for the sand/rocks on the road, and don't race down roads you're not familiar with!
     
AKcrab
Moderator Emeritus
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 03:17 AM
 
Originally Posted by viperstrike
- push right, go right...HUH?!? (Once you master this, turning is so FUN!)[/IMG]
Could someone elaborate on this? I've never been on a motorcycle, and this confuses me.
     
viperstrike
Fresh-Faced Recruit
Join Date: Aug 2002
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 03:31 AM
 
Originally Posted by AKcrab
Could someone elaborate on this? I've never been on a motorcycle, and this confuses me.
It's called counter-steering. Google will bring up a load of stuff. The basics of it is, turning the bars RIGHT going more than 20mph will turn the bike LEFT. To not confuse people, instructors say it as 'push right, go right' and the same with left.

[Edited: section removed because I apparently was smoking crack when I wrote this part], but learning this will teach you how to not under-steer a corner and keep from drifting into oncoming traffic.

Google will tell you more in as much or as little details as you like.
( Last edited by viperstrike; Jul 4, 2005 at 07:26 AM. )
     
phantomdragonz  (op)
Mac Elite
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Near Boulder, CO
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 03:32 AM
 
Originally Posted by AKcrab
Could someone elaborate on this? I've never been on a motorcycle, and this confuses me.
he is talking about counter steering.... it's a weird conter-intuitive practice that apparently exists...


YOU ARE NOT RAINING ON MY "PARADE"

I am terrified of other drivers, even in my car... you have all told me very good things about riding, but none of you are "raining on my perade" I know the problems with other people, I know I am not invincable, I was telling my friend today that the vast majority of motorcycle accidents are because of other drivers just plain not seeing them... and people being retarded and flying around blind corners...

what do you expect to see when you turn your head to look down a road... a FAT car... not a razor thing motorcycle...

I bought a jacket today,Here is a link to the jacket i bought FreeFlyer brought up a really good point about the gloves, I will buy a pair tomorrow, and I plan on buying a nice pair, I spend about $175 on my jacket today, I will buy pants when I can afford them (two weeks, before I even have my license)


Oh, and I have a helmet, I have a total of three now, two closed faced and one MX/snowmobiling helmet...

Zach
     
glyph
Junior Member
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Alaska
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 03:37 AM
 
Could someone elaborate on this? I've never been on a motorcycle, and this confuses me.
It works. You have to be up to speed first.

I though I was being given bad advise when I was told to do this the first time, but I tried it - just a little - and it pulled me in the opposite direction. Alternatively, you could pull left, go right, ect.
     
himself
Mac Elite
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Live at the BBQ
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 06:31 AM
 
Originally Posted by AKcrab
Could someone elaborate on this? I've never been on a motorcycle, and this confuses me.
It really means to push down on the right handle bar to go right, vice-versa for left... in other words, lean the bike to the right to go right, vice-versa to go left.

I took the MSF course here in Chicago a couple of summers ago, and I got hooked. I had already been a biker (bicycles) for more than 10 years, and motorcycling is straight bananas. I still need to get a new bike, though...

For some reason, I love the Guzzies (lovin that Ambassador, broxy5) and Triumphs, so that's what I'll be looking at.

I look at a lot of the knuckle heads riding these days, and they obviously haven't learned from experienced pros... so keep any eye out for crazy four-(plus) wheelers and two wheelers. No one else out there is looking out for bikers, so take care of yourselves.

Just had a thought... who wants to start up a MacNN bikers club?
"Bill Gates can't guarantee Windows... how can you guarantee my safety?"
-John Crichton
     
Footy
Mac Elite
Join Date: Apr 2000
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 09:49 AM
 
I took the MSF course here in Chicago a couple of summers ago, and I got hooked.

I look at a lot of the knuckle heads riding these days, and they obviously haven't learned from experienced pros...

Just had a thought... who wants to start up a MacNN bikers club?
Live in the Chicago area too, NW burbs. IL is an optional helmet state and I bet 80% of the riders I see sadly, choose not to wear a helmet. Just can't figure it out.

Any who, here's a link to some good riding gear. If you choose not to wear leathers or textile pants, they have a great option in jeans here. http://www.dragginjeans.com/ They also have a long sleeve shirt made from 100% Kevlar if it's just to hot to ride with that jacket on. No it's not as safe as a jacket but it's certainly better than nothing if one chooses go ride without.

My current ride, only difference being my tank letters are black. 2002 Suzuki TL1000R:
     
ihatesuvs68
Baninated
Join Date: Mar 2005
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 10:12 AM
 
I like bikes...but you're over 80 times more likely to die on one than in a car. Just be careful. I have a moped than can do 50mph, but I don't think I want anything faster. Ever.
     
vexborg
Senior User
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: 54 56' 38" .058N / 10 0' 33" .071E
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 10:40 AM
 
Originally Posted by broxy5
Mine

Me want one!

A classic
The gene pool needs cleaning - I'll be the chlorine.
     
Randman
Posting Junkie
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: MacNN database error. Please refresh your browser.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 10:53 AM
 
Nice. Thought about getting a Harley for cruises one of these days.

This is a computer-generated message and needs no signature.
     
Lancer409
Professional Poster
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Semi Posting Retirement *ReJoice!*
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 10:56 AM
 
not to rain on your parade, but please be careful ... i'm too scared of riding a motorcycle. the statistics creep me out and it's not IF you ever wipe out ... it's WHEN. Stay safe and take care out on the motorway guys (and gals)

No trees were killed in the sending of this message. However, a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.
     
wdlove
Addicted to MacNN
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Boston, MA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 11:20 AM
 
I don't have one my self. I do have a neighbor that has a Harley. The blue color is very nice.

"Never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never - in nothing, great or small, large or petty - never give in except to convictions of honor and good sense." Winston Churchill
     
budster101
Baninated
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Illinois might be cold and flat, but at least it's ugly.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 11:21 AM
 

I want this one.

Don't be this guy.



Is this why you got one?

     
budster101
Baninated
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Illinois might be cold and flat, but at least it's ugly.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 11:27 AM
 
Originally Posted by ihatesuvs68
I like bikes...but you're over 80 times more likely to die on one than in a car. Just be careful. I have a moped than can do 50mph, but I don't think I want anything faster. Ever.
I like mopeds.

http://image28.webshots.com/29/2/63/...4wHyBQK_ph.jpg

You are 1,000 times more likely to get killed on a moped going 40mph than on a motorcycle.

BTW: Is this you?

http://www.ece.osu.edu/~schuettm/per...iles/moped.jpg

     
ghporter
Administrator
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: San Antonio TX USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 11:43 AM
 
Countersteering works through the gyroscopic force of the front wheel. By pushing the other way just a little, you cause the front wheel to precess, which both leans the bike and turns the front wheel in the correct direction-and the effect is coordinated too; no over-lean or understeer because the gyroscopic force is causing it, not the rider.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
ReggieX
Professional Poster
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Toronto, ON
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 12:46 PM
 
Originally Posted by phantomdragonz
I should note that I have only beed riding it around my block, have not been over 25mph yet...
I though this said BLEED

I've been wanting to get a bike for years, just the financial situation never really allowed for it. Plus I'd want a garage to store/work on it, and that just doesn't happen in most rental situations.
The Lord said 'Peter, I can see your house from here.'
     
phantomdragonz  (op)
Mac Elite
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Near Boulder, CO
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 12:54 PM
 
Originally Posted by Lancer409
not to rain on your parade,
lol, how many people have said that to me? I think it's funny...

So instead of being tempted to ride it around I have just been working on it. I have since changed the oil/filter, I cleaned it up, found where the tools are on the bike, tightened the rear shock up some, found out my front light points to the sky (P.O. rear ended someone) so that has to be fixed... I ordered a new bigger rear sprocket (45T stock to 55T) and I have a new chain...

I can't wait to get my license much less TAGS for the bike...

Zach
     
Xeo
Moderator Emeritus
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Austin, MN, USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 01:43 PM
 
When I learn, it's going to be on a 1980 Honda Goldwing 1100. If it ever comes back from the shop, I'll do it. It's always sounded like it would be a lot of fun. I've never ridden though.
     
ihatesuvs68
Baninated
Join Date: Mar 2005
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 2, 2005, 02:05 PM
 
Originally Posted by budster101
I like mopeds.

http://image28.webshots.com/29/2/63/...4wHyBQK_ph.jpg

You are 1,000 times more likely to get killed on a moped going 40mph than on a motorcycle.

BTW: Is this you?

http://www.ece.osu.edu/~schuettm/per...iles/moped.jpg

Your first pic doesn't work. Have any information on the moped safety stuff? I'd be interested. And no, this is me, when I got it 2 years ago:

     
broxy5
Dedicated MacNNer
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: no fixed address
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 3, 2005, 02:00 PM
 
Originally Posted by AKcrab
Could someone elaborate on this? I've never been on a motorcycle, and this confuses me.
Gyroscopic precession. Force applied acts at 90 degrees in the direction of rotation. I was a flight instructor for a while, and a bike wheel/ motorcycle turning principle is the easiest way to demonstrate gyroscopic precession. Works great teaching a pilot how to steerr a m/c (after he almost ran me into opposite direction trraffic on a right turn)
     
budster101
Baninated
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Illinois might be cold and flat, but at least it's ugly.
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 3, 2005, 04:03 PM
 
RE: The moped safety stuff. Stay away from anything bigger than you going faster than you. Rednecks in pickup trucks notoriously drive while intoxicated and love to run you guys over. Hell, they try and run me down in my Chevy...



Nice moped, looks like a classic.
     
AKcrab
Moderator Emeritus
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 3, 2005, 05:39 PM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter
Countersteering works through the gyroscopic force of the front wheel. By pushing the other way just a little, you cause the front wheel to precess, which both leans the bike and turns the front wheel in the correct direction-and the effect is coordinated too; no over-lean or understeer because the gyroscopic force is causing it, not the rider.
Originally Posted by broxy5
Gyroscopic precession. Force applied acts at 90 degrees in the direction of rotation. I was a flight instructor for a while, and a bike wheel/ motorcycle turning principle is the easiest way to demonstrate gyroscopic precession. Works great teaching a pilot how to steerr a m/c (after he almost ran me into opposite direction trraffic on a right turn)
Excellent. That makes perfect sense. Thanks for the explanation.
     
ghporter
Administrator
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: San Antonio TX USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 3, 2005, 06:09 PM
 
I have to agree about the larger likelihood of an accident while you're riding something small. I had three "mishaps" in my first year of riding, all on a Honda "Passport," a 73cc bike that looks like a scooter but isn't. Here's a picture:

A part of the reasons for my accidents was the size of the bike-obviously rather small. Smaller size equates to less gyroscopic stability, which means the bike will behave more like a bicycle and less like a motorcycle. With big wheels and more mass, a larger bike has more inertial and gyro stability. But more to the point, it isn't an imposing bike. I was once run off the road in an "S" curve by someone going the other direction because they must have completely ignored me-and I was over six feet tall even then, riding a bike exactly like the one in the picture. Larger bikes get a little more attention, but the RIDER has to be visible, too. That helps a lot! I had absolutely ZERO problems on my Silverwing, a 500cc touring bike that was supposed to be like the Goldwing's little brother, but which Honda retired after only a couple of years.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
broxy5
Dedicated MacNNer
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: no fixed address
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 3, 2005, 06:33 PM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter
I have to agree about the larger likelihood of an accident while you're riding something small. I had three "mishaps" in my first year of riding, all on a Honda "Passport," a 73cc bike that looks like a scooter but isn't. Here's a picture:

A part of the reasons for my accidents was the size of the bike-obviously rather small. Smaller size equates to less gyroscopic stability, which means the bike will behave more like a bicycle and less like a motorcycle. With big wheels and more mass, a larger bike has more inertial and gyro stability. But more to the point, it isn't an imposing bike. I was once run off the road in an "S" curve by someone going the other direction because they must have completely ignored me-and I was over six feet tall even then, riding a bike exactly like the one in the picture. Larger bikes get a little more attention, but the RIDER has to be visible, too. That helps a lot! I had absolutely ZERO problems on my Silverwing, a 500cc touring bike that was supposed to be like the Goldwing's little brother, but which Honda retired after only a couple of years.

sorry ghporter, I didn't read enough to see that you mentioned gyros. Anyhow, I have always lusted after Passports, and have yet to own one, but I shall. having too much fun with the Guzzi Ambassador though. Had this Guzzi 850T as my only tranportation for 6 years when I lived in Victoria. Rain or shine baby!!!....and some snow and ice.

     
Drakino
Grizzled Veteran
Join Date: Apr 2001
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 4, 2005, 06:23 PM
 
There are a ton of great places to ride in Colorado. I got my bike back in 2002, and this will be my 4th summer riding. And even with 9k miles on the bike, I'm still finding new places to go.



Thats my best show off shot of the bike with the local scenery.



Thats a better shot of a true mountain area. The fire scar visible there is one of the edges of the Hayman fire. I rode through the areas that it burned out shortly after they got it under control. It was very eye opening about the dangers of forrest fires.
<This space under renovation>
     
ghporter
Administrator
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: San Antonio TX USA
Status: Offline
Reply With Quote
Jul 4, 2005, 06:26 PM
 
Originally Posted by broxy5
sorry ghporter, I didn't read enough to see that you mentioned gyros. Anyhow, I have always lusted after Passports, and have yet to own one, but I shall. having too much fun with the Guzzi Ambassador though. Had this Guzzi 850T as my only tranportation for 6 years when I lived in Victoria. Rain or shine baby!!!....and some snow and ice.

I've always thought Guzzis were beautiful bikes-in the same league with Ducatis (Italian styling again!), but with their own character. They're just too darn expensive for me. My ideal bike is either a 1000cc BMW touring bike or a new Honda Gold Wing. Unfortunately, both potential ideals are "in the future" because I'm back at being a poor college student again.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
   
Thread Tools
 
Forum Links
Forum Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Top
Privacy Policy
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:37 PM.
All contents of these forums © 1995-2017 MacNN. All rights reserved.
Branding + Design: www.gesamtbild.com
vBulletin v.3.8.8 © 2000-2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.,