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You are here: MacNN Forums > Community > MacNN Lounge > Favorite pre-rock American/Latin music styles

View Poll Results: Music styles you like
Poll Options:
Dixieland 1 votes (5.56%)
Big Band Swing 8 votes (44.44%)
Ragtime 0 votes (0%)
Boogie Woogie 2 votes (11.11%)
Bebop 2 votes (11.11%)
Cool/West Coast 6 votes (33.33%)
Hard Bop/Soul Jazz 3 votes (16.67%)
Funk/Fusion 4 votes (22.22%)
Classic Blues 4 votes (22.22%)
Rhythm and Blues 4 votes (22.22%)
Salsa/Bossa Nova/Samba 5 votes (27.78%)
Freeform/Acid 0 votes (0%)
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 18. You may not vote on this poll
Favorite pre-rock American/Latin music styles
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besson3c
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Feb 4, 2009, 04:13 PM
 
Jawbone has inspired me. As a jazz musician it is always interesting to learn about what music people are interested in these days that is connected to my own musical sphere...

It's too bad that we're only limited to 12 poll options, but click all that appeal to you please...
     
Laminar
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Feb 4, 2009, 04:14 PM
 
IBTP all caps
     
IceEnclosure
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Feb 4, 2009, 09:00 PM
 
I don't like salsa but I enjoy bossa nova and samba music.
ice
     
besson3c  (op)
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Feb 4, 2009, 09:01 PM
 
Jobim?
     
besson3c  (op)
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Feb 4, 2009, 09:04 PM
 
Are there any styles here that you voters could not provide an example of, just to put the results into context?
     
IceEnclosure
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Feb 4, 2009, 09:28 PM
 
Jobim, Gilberto and Getz ease my mind after a tough day.
ice
     
ghporter
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Feb 4, 2009, 09:37 PM
 
Jazz (in all early forms) led directly into big band, which led to the early rock "combos" and thus to rock itself. But jazz split into so many different branches that it's hard for me to like most of them. Acid and freeform jazz usually give me a headache. Some of the more avant-garde styles sound exactly like what you'd get if you let a crowd of preschoolers loose with expensive instruments and recorded it... But cool jazz is cool. I like smooth and sophisticated jazz, some Latin and especially the smoother samba and mambo pieces. And in all, I like a combination of rhythm, melody (acid never seemed to like melody at all), and design (as opposed to simply riffing). So there's probably tons of what is called "jazz" that I wouldn't like at all, and tons that isn't called jazz that I'd like because I think it's jazz.

Just heard Jobim for the first time this morning, by the way-VERY cool stuff.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
Chongo
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Feb 4, 2009, 09:38 PM
 
Goodman, Miller, Nat Cole, Joe Turner, Little Walter. I hate what Mel has done to XM channels. They're top 40 pop channels when they were once Decades channels, Playing everything from that decade, not just Frankie Avalon. I could hear all the styles listed above, not anymore!
45/47
     
besson3c  (op)
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Feb 4, 2009, 09:46 PM
 
ghporter: smooth and sophisticated jazz like Sinatra, Chet Baker, Ella Fitzgerald, Oscar Peterson, Bill Evans, 50s Miles Davis, Count Basie, Diana Krall, and stuff like that? I'm just trying to make sure I understand what you mean, exactly... I know this stuff is sometimes hard to talk about and express in words.
     
Chuckit
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Feb 4, 2009, 10:44 PM
 
There was good music before rock?
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besson3c  (op)
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Feb 4, 2009, 11:49 PM
 
Originally Posted by Chuckit View Post
There was good music before rock?
I thought you liked symphonic music, or am I thinking of somebody else?
     
Andy8
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Feb 5, 2009, 02:37 AM
 
Bossa Nova
     
Spheric Harlot
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Feb 5, 2009, 05:23 AM
 
Originally Posted by ghporter View Post
Jazz (in all early forms) led directly into big band, which led to the early rock "combos" and thus to rock itself.
Big band had very little to do with rock 'n' roll.

You're not even halfway at rock 'n' roll without the Blues. In fact, rock 'n' roll, to a large extent, *is* blues - the structure, the melodies, the riffs.
     
besson3c  (op)
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Feb 5, 2009, 09:37 AM
 
Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
Big band had very little to do with rock 'n' roll.

You're not even halfway at rock 'n' roll without the Blues. In fact, rock 'n' roll, to a large extent, *is* blues - the structure, the melodies, the riffs.
Big Band had a lot to do with Rock, and you can safely say that the Blues is a part of most western music.

Big Band influenced Rock because Big Band was primarily music for dancing, and once it had run its course and jazz turned to Bebop there was a cultural void previously occupied by Big Band music and its social implications. You're right that early rock and roll resembled the Blues more than it did Big Band jazz, but Big Band was very much considered pop music prior to Rock, so culturally it was quite influential to early Rock.
     
Maflynn
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Feb 5, 2009, 09:44 AM
 
[classic] rock for me, but since that wasn't an option, I couldn't vote. I do like the blues, not sure if its "classic blues" or Rhythm and Blues, all I know it as blues and I like it. That's probably as close to the poll as I'm going to get.
~Mike
     
besson3c  (op)
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Feb 5, 2009, 09:55 AM
 
Rhythm and Blues was a genre formed post WW II, usually consisting of electric instruments, a steady rhythm, and closely resembled early rock. Classic Blues came before R&B and was generally associated with black, female singers in the 1920s:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classic_female_blues


What do you like about the Blues, Maflynn?
     
gofridge
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Feb 5, 2009, 10:20 AM
 
gofridge sees no reason to listen to any music recorded before 1985.

The Super Bowl Shuffle re-defined music, and made everything recorded before it sound dated.
     
zro
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Feb 5, 2009, 10:21 AM
 
Pre-rock funk. Yeah, that's my favorite. WTF?

And since when is Ray Charles big band?
     
Maflynn
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Feb 5, 2009, 10:34 AM
 
Originally Posted by besson3c View Post
What do you like about the Blues, Maflynn?
John-Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters are my favorite Blues artist right now, I also like Clapton's work especially when he did some blues especially with BB King. I'm sure its more akin to R&B but I also like Ray Charles and I'm not sure where Stevie Ray Vaughn fits in but I like his music as well.
~Mike
     
Laminar
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Feb 5, 2009, 10:35 AM
 
I'm a big fan of Kenny G. That guy can compose like no other.
     
besson3c  (op)
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Feb 5, 2009, 11:00 AM
 
Originally Posted by Maflynn View Post
John-Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters are my favorite Blues artist right now, I also like Clapton's work especially when he did some blues especially with BB King. I'm sure its more akin to R&B but I also like Ray Charles and I'm not sure where Stevie Ray Vaughn fits in but I like his music as well.
I mean, do you like the harmonic colors? The story telling? The way emotions are expressed? The grooves? I'm wondering because if you clearly like the Blues there are lots of other forms of music that share many of these characterstics. For instance, gospel, early rock (I'm talking about doo-wap, barbershop, Chuck Berry, Elvis, Back to the Future when MJF goes back in time to his parent's era sort of stuff. I suspect when many people say they like Rock they may or may not be referring to this, as the term has become somewhat vague), Motown, Soul, Jazz, etc.
     
Maflynn
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Feb 5, 2009, 11:11 AM
 
I'm by no means any sort of audiophile or someone who is incredibly into music, so I typically don't analyze why I like the music I like.

I suppose, mostly its the harmonic colors that the blues portray and then the emotions expressed in the music but to be honest, I've not really given it too much thought. I buy music, be it rock, blues or gospel because it strikes a chord with me.
~Mike
     
SpaceMonkey
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Feb 5, 2009, 12:43 PM
 
Originally Posted by zro View Post
Pre-rock funk. Yeah, that's my favorite. WTF?
Yeah, I don't quite understand how Funk/fusion can be categorized as "pre-rock," but it's my favorite of the genres listed.

"One ticket to Washington, please. I have a date with destiny."
     
Spheric Harlot
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Feb 5, 2009, 12:43 PM
 
Originally Posted by besson3c View Post
Big Band had a lot to do with Rock, and you can safely say that the Blues is a part of most western music.

Big Band influenced Rock because Big Band was primarily music for dancing, and once it had run its course and jazz turned to Bebop there was a cultural void previously occupied by Big Band music and its social implications. You're right that early rock and roll resembled the Blues more than it did Big Band jazz, but Big Band was very much considered pop music prior to Rock, so culturally it was quite influential to early Rock.
Other than rock 'n' roll filling the void left by the demise of Big Band swing, though, there's very little common musical heritage, no?

So big band swing didn't "lead" to rock 'n' roll; it "gave way" to rock 'n' roll - and even that isn't quite true.
     
besson3c  (op)
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Feb 5, 2009, 12:50 PM
 
Originally Posted by SpaceMonkey View Post
Yeah, I don't quite understand how Funk/fusion can be categorized as "pre-rock," but it's my favorite of the genres listed.
Yeah, I see your point. My title is awkward enough as it is, I just couldn't think of anything better at the time. I would suggest ignoring it, I'm not happy with it either
     
besson3c  (op)
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Feb 5, 2009, 01:02 PM
 
Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
Other than rock 'n' roll filling the void left by the demise of Big Band swing, though, there's very little common musical heritage, no?

So big band swing didn't "lead" to rock 'n' roll; it "gave way" to rock 'n' roll - and even that isn't quite true.

Maybe, maybe not... It's a little murky. The blues and jazz sort of forked shortly after the brass bands, I guess, but they've always been close cousins. Some artists, such as Bessie Smith, were often considered to be in both camps. The harmonic structure of the Blues has always been a part of many forms of jazz, as has the basic 12 bar song form. There is an undeniable relationship there.

The way I understand it, Big Band was sort of that first milestone along the one road in that fork, but if you look at the Classic Blues that was happening simultaneously you might think that it doesn't bare much resemblance to early Rock either.

The way I look at it is like this: all western music beyond early blues and swing/Big Band are basically compromised of both. When we talk about swing, we talk about the groove and the fact that you can dance to it, this came out of the Big Band era. Even if the sounds and styles have changed, this basically started here. On the Blues side you have the element of story telling, and the basic expression of emotion as it relates to humanity (the Blues can be happy too). Rock is essentially an amalgamation of both.

I hope this makes sense.
     
olePigeon
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Feb 5, 2009, 02:46 PM
 
Originally Posted by Andy8 View Post
Bossa Nova
Chevy Nova?

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Excelleeeeent!
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ghporter
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Feb 5, 2009, 07:17 PM
 
Originally Posted by besson3c View Post
ghporter: smooth and sophisticated jazz like Sinatra, Chet Baker, Ella Fitzgerald, Oscar Peterson, Bill Evans, 50s Miles Davis, Count Basie, Diana Krall, and stuff like that? I'm just trying to make sure I understand what you mean, exactly... I know this stuff is sometimes hard to talk about and express in words.
Generally in that style, yes. I can groove to that sort of stuff very easily, whether it's by one of the names mentioned or by someone I've never heard of. Sort of "lounge" jazz. I especially like a piece that goes through the classic jazz structure, with everybody playing through the piece, then each musician playing his own solo (especially when that solo is something like a horn or a bass), and of course when the vocalist is a "musician" in that sense as well.

Like I said, I like a whole lot of different kinds of music, but I gravitate to big band and big band-like pieces that let me hear everything and how the musician feels about his part.

And I am sad about how the decade channels on XM have degraded; I used to listen to the 40s channel all the time, and I got a lot of exposure to the not-so well known names from that period from doing that. I don't want "Hit Parade," I want a smorgasbord of what was being listened to then.

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
ghporter
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Feb 5, 2009, 07:21 PM
 
Originally Posted by Spheric Harlot View Post
Big band had very little to do with rock 'n' roll.

You're not even halfway at rock 'n' roll without the Blues. In fact, rock 'n' roll, to a large extent, *is* blues - the structure, the melodies, the riffs.
Big band led to "combos" or "small bands" which was directly responsible for the 6-8 piece band and backup singers behind a "name" singer (think early Elvis). Because big bands were expensive and ballrooms were hard to pack after WWII, they often did shows and clubs with part of the original "big" band, highlighting a particular vocalist. So while the content owes a huge debt to basic blues, rock also owes a lot to the structure of the fragmented big bands. And there couldn't have been early rock 'n' roll without the structure to enable musicians and vocalists to be heard (and recorded).

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
Doofy
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Feb 5, 2009, 07:31 PM
 
Of course, rock existed long before Amerika was a speck in Washington's eye. Medieval English folk music is the earliest rock music.
Been inclined to wander... off the beaten track.
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waxcrash
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Feb 5, 2009, 08:30 PM
 
Originally Posted by Doofy View Post
Of course, rock existed long before Amerika was a speck in Washington's eye. Medieval English folk music is the earliest rock music.
You are right about that. The Irish, English, and Scottish came to America and started bluegrass, which evolved into country, blues, and jazz. If you listen to Bluegrass, you notice that each person takes a turn playing a melody and improvising around it while the other instruments play the accompaniment, which is an early form of jazz. From county and blues came rock. Most people don't give bluegrass the credit it deserves.
( Last edited by waxcrash; Feb 5, 2009 at 09:00 PM. )
     
ghporter
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Feb 5, 2009, 09:14 PM
 
Originally Posted by Doofy View Post
Of course, rock existed long before Amerika was a speck in Washington's eye. Medieval English folk music is the earliest rock music.
I know of a pipe band that does a very mean "Smoke on the Water." They do a really good "In A Gadda De Vida" too. So the bagpipe and drum arrangement of what are often considered "classic rock" standards works pretty darn well.

Considering the lineage of blues, (from Scots-Irish immigrants' old folk music to the music of the rural South, with the addition of African and Caribbean ingredients), it's only "huh!" rather than "you're kidding!"

Glenn -----OTR/L, MOT, Tx
     
TheWOAT
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Feb 6, 2009, 01:40 PM
 
Id say.. Miles Davis B.Brew and that era is what I like. I also like Mambo. Mariachi and "trio" music is good too.
     
   
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